Upcoming Events & Opportunities: November 24, 2014

ANNOUNCEMENTS

[1] York Undergraduates Going Google

[2] New Issue- Refuge 30.2

EVENTS

[1] CFR Performance & Talk- Andil Gosine & Melissa Laveaux- York University- November 24, 2014

[2] Lecture- Jan Anderson- Of No Nation: Writing Enslaved Women into Human Sorority and Citizenship in the Americas- York University- November 25, 2014

[3] Panel Discussion- Up for Debate campaign: Women's Issues- University of Toronto- November 25, 2014

[4] Lecture- Dr. Bronwyn Winter- The Emergence of an LGBTI Human Rights Norm: Perspectives and Problems- Toronto- November 25, 2014

[5] CFR Speaker- Dr. Bronwyn Winter- Has September 11, 2001 Changed the World for Women?- York University- November 26, 2014

[6] Lecture- Dr. Tirso Gonzales- Indigenous Peoples & Neotropical Conservation: South American Andean Indigenous Emerging Paradigms on Bio-cultural Landscapes in the Context of Climate Change- York University- November 26, 2014

[7] Lecture- Stefano Tijerina- Canadian Imperialism: The History of the Extractive Industry in Colombia- York University- November 27, 2014

[8] Sex Salon- Zoë Newman, David Seitz, Shawna Carroll- University of Toronto- November 27, 2014

[9] Event- The Renaissance Woman: Celebrating the Life and Leadership of Dr. Maya Angelou- Toronto- November 27, 2014

[10] Film Premiere- African Grandmothers Tribunal: Seeking justice at the frontlines of the AIDS crisis- Toronto- November 27, 2014

[11] Film- Huicholes: The Last Peyote Guardians- York University- November 27, 2014

[12] CCV Workshop- SSHRC Insight Development Grant Competition- York University- November 28, 2014 OR December 17, 2014

[13] Panel- 2014 Toronto Election: Implications for Politics & Social Justice in the Inner Suburbs- York University- December 1, 2014

[14] Documentary Screening-  Gulabi Gang- Toronto- December 2, 2014

[15] Talk- AJ Withers- Invisible Austerity, Neo-Liberalism and Disability- York University- December 3, 2014

CALLS

[1] Allies- Coalition of Allies- Sex Worker Safety

[2] Paper- Conference- Women and Tax Justice at Beijing+20: Taxing and Budgeting for Sex Equality

[3] Abstract- Conference- Maternal Subjectivities: Psychology/Psychoanalysis, Literature, Culture and the Arts- deadline December 1, 2014

[4] Submission- Conference- Critical Ethnic Studies Association Conference/Gathering- deadline December 15, 2014

[5] Contributions- Conference for Critical Ethnic Studies- Sovereignties and Colonialisms: Resisting Racism, Extraction and Dispossession- deadline December 15, 2014

[6] Abstracts- Conference- (In)dependency and its Tensions: Democracy, Culture and (Post)Development- deadline January 15, 2015

[7] Manuscripts- Journal- Reconstituting Race in Youth Studies- deadline April 30, 2014

OPPORTUNITIES

[1] Professor- Institute of Feminist and Gender Studies- University of Ottawa- deadline November 28, 2014

[2] Editor- Demeter Press- deadline December 10, 2014

ANNOUNCEMENTS

[1] York Undergraduates Going Google  

Message on behalf of Bob Gagne, Chief Information Officer and Dr. Janet Morrison, Vice-Provost Students

Subject: York Undergraduates Going Google

After broad consultation, University Information Technology and the Division of Students are pleased to announce that York University will soon move its undergraduate email service from York’s central mail system to the Google Apps platform.  As a direct result of this change, York students will be able to access their email and calendars from anywhere; they will be able to create, edit and share documents, spreadsheets, presentations and forms using any internet-connected computer, tablet or mobile device. Further, they will benefit from unlimited email and storage capacity as well as the robust, innovative features available in Google Apps.

Google Apps will provide a better user experience for our students and will place York University in the company of other Canadian schools such as Ryerson, McMaster, University of Ottawa and others that have adopted Google Apps for its student email service.

Please stay tuned.  Over the coming weeks you will receive updates, including information on where you can go to learn more about this exciting project.

Regards

Bob Gagne                                        Dr. Janet Morrison

Chief Information Officer                        Vice-Provost Students

[2] New Issue- Refuge 30.2

Refuge 30.2 (General Issue) Now Published
We are pleased to announce that Refuge 30.1 (General Issue) has been published. Please click here to view this issue.
Vol 30, No 2 (2014): General Issue
Table of Contents
Articles

The 1951 Refugee Convention’s Contingent Rights Framework and Article 26 of the ICCPR: A Fundamental Incompatibility? PDF
Marina Sharpe

 

Seen in Its True Light: Desertion as a Pure Political Crime PDF
Amar Khoday

 

Arrested Development? UNHCR, ILO, and the Refugees’ Right to Work PDF
Adèle Garnier

 

In the Wake of Irregular Arrivals: Changes to the Canadian Immigration Detention System PDF
Stephanie Silverman

 

Temporariness, Rights, and Citizenship: The Latest Chapter in Canada’s Exclusionary Migration and Refugee History PDF
Amrita Hari

 

“What happens there ... follows us here”: Resettled but Still at Risk: Refugee Women and Girls in Australia PDF
Linda Bartolomei, Rebecca Eckert, Eileen Pittaway

 

Gendered Perspectives on Refugee Determination in Canada PDF
Tanya Aberman

 

(En)Gendering Vulnerability: Immigrant Service Providers’ Perceptions of Needs, Policies, and Practices Related to Gender and Women Refugee Claimants in Atlantic Canada PDF
Evangelia Tastsoglou, Catherine Baillie Abidi, Susan M. Brigham, Elizabeth A. Lange

 

The Meeting of Myths and Realities: The “Homecoming” of Second-Generation Exiles in Post-Apartheid South Africa PDF
Zosa Olenka De Sas Kropiwnicki

Book Review

Governing Refugees: Justice, Order and Legal Pluralism PDF
Anna Purkey

 

The International Law of Migrant Smuggling PDF
Awalou Ouedraogo

 

Young, Well-Educated and Adaptable: Chilean Exiles in Ontario and Quebec, 1973–2010 PDF
Morgan Poteet

EVENTS

[1] CFR Performance & Talk- Andil Gosine & Melissa Laveaux- York University- November 24, 2014

The Centre for Feminist Research Presents:

ANDIL GOSINE + MELISSA LAVEAUX

Private Dancer: a Performance and Talk

November 24, 2014

2:30 pm – 4.30pm Founders Assembly Hall

Andil Gosine and Melissa Laveaux share their collaborative practice and exploration of creolité in this prose and music performance and talk hosted by the Centre for Feminist Research. Haitian-Canadian, Paris-based singer-songwriter Laveaux will perform music from her debut and sophomore albums that draw on queer and feminist themes, as well as from her work with Gosine considers intimate legacies of historical experiences of traumatic migration of Caribbean peoples--and which references Tina Turner’s “Private Dancer.”

Andil Gosine is Associate Professor of Sociology at York University, and an artist.  His latest video work "BATHWATER A Sur Rodney (Sur) Story" recently premiered at the New York Mix Festival, and his forthcoming publications include "Rescue and Real Love: Same Sex Desire in International Development," published as a 10-year reflection on his work in the area, by the Institute of Development Studies (Sussex).

Melissa Laveaux is an acclaimed Haitian-Canadian singer-songwriter who lives in Paris, France, where she is signed to the label No Format. Her first two albums, Camphor and Copper and Dying Is A Wild Night combine folk, indie pop and her signature percussive finger-style blues guitar for a style that is both sophisticated and sweet.  Her most recent hits include "Triggers," "Generous Bones" and "Postman."  She is currently at work on her third album for No Format.

Please note this talk counts towards seminar credit for GFWS students.

[2] Lecture- Jan Anderson- Of No Nation: Writing Enslaved Women into Human Sorority and Citizenship in the Americas- York University- November 25, 2014

Tuesday, November 25, 2014
Kaneff Tower – 8th Floor Lounge
12:00 – 2:00 pm

Janice Anderson is an MA candidate in Humanities at York University in Toronto, Canada. She is a Research Associate with the Centre for Research on Latin America and the Caribbean (CERLAC) as well as the Harriet Tubman Institute for Research on Africa and its Diasporas.
“Of No Nation: Writing Enslaved Women into Human Sorority and Citizenship in the Americas” proposes a critical re-examination of the process of black female subjects writing themselves into being from the genre of slave narrative to other works the research engages as “factitious imaginary renderings.” My presentation focuses on Lawrence Hill’s The Book of Negroes (2007), as a sample rendering of black female presence as “citizen” at “home in the Americas”. It is distinct from slave narratives and neo-slave narrative that revisits the trauma of slavery.

My work engages debates on the function, facticity and emergent subjectivities within slave narratives. It converses with literary theorist Martha Cobb who argued the significance of first-person voice in projecting experiences of black reality on the narrators’ own terms rather than those imposed by the enslaving society (Cobb, 1982). Among others, Timothy Spaulding took up the question of first person narrative as a convention of slave narrative form and as a symbol of black subjectivity (Spaulding, 2005). Historians Sekora and Heglar argue that literary authority remains contested because it was not black storytelling but white authentication that made for usable narratives (Sekora, 1987; Helgar, 2001).
The factitious imaginary rendering encourages a review of Canada’s role in Trans-Atlantic slavery beyond a questionable metanarrative. Particularly through the analysis of Hill’s work, Canada is repositioned in the theorizing of literary and cultural production of the African diaspora.

[3] Panel Discussion- Up for Debate campaign: Women's Issues- University of Toronto- November 25, 2014

Oxfam University of Toronto will be hosting a panel discussion on the Up for Debate campaign recently launched by a coalition of women's groups. The campaign calls for a nationally televised leaders' debate in next year's federal election devoted specifically to women's issues. This campaign presents an important opportunity to let our political leaders know that Canadians want them to make meaningful commitments to change women’s lives for the better, both in Canada and abroad.

The event is taking place at 6:30pm (doors open at 6pm) on November 25th at Hart House in the debates room (2nd floor). Join representatives from Oxfam Canada, the YWCA, and Sistering, as well as NDP Status of Women Critic Niki Ashton as they discuss this campaign and the state of women's rights in Canada and abroad. The panel will be moderated by Prof. Judith Taylor of U of T's Women and Gender Studies Institute. Light refreshments will be served afterwards.

From missing and murdered indigenous women to unequal pay for equal work, there's a lot to discuss.

Attendance is free, but you can reserve a spot at https://www.facebook.com/events/268398909950614

Hope to see you there!

Oxfam University of Toronto
https://www.facebook.com/OxfamUofT

[4] Lecture- Dr. Bronwyn Winter- The Emergence of an LGBTI Human Rights Norm: Perspectives and Problems- Toronto- November 25, 2014

New Challenge for Human Rights?

The Emergence of an LGBTI Human Rights Norm: Perspectives and Problems

A lecture by Dr. Bronwyn Winter

Date: November 25, 2014

Time: 6:30 - 8:30 PM

Location: Room 2-295, OISE, 252 Bloor St W., Toronto

Bronwyn Winter is in the Department of French Studies at the University of Sydney, where she teaches in International and GLobal Studies, European Studies, French Studies and International and Comparative literary studies.  Her publications include Hijab and the Republic: Uncovering the French Headscarf Debate, and After Shock: September 11, 2011: Global Feminist Perspectives.  She is also on the international editorial board of the forthcoming Enclyopedia of Gender and Sexuality Studies.

Program Overview:

Introduction to the history and politics of the emergence of an LGBT human rights norm.

Discussion on "Gender Identity & Sexual Orientation"

Is every social justice issue a human rights issue.

View flyer here: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/cwse/UserFiles/File/Browyn_s_flyer_changes.pdf

[5] CFR Speaker- Dr. Bronwyn Winter- Has September 11, 2001 Changed the World for Women?- York University- November 26, 2014

The Centre for Feminist Research and the Department of Equity Studies present:

Guest Speaker Dr. Bronwyn Winter
Has September 11, 2001 Changed the World for Women?

Introduced by Dr. Haideh Moghissi

November 26, 2014 | 280N, York Lanes
2:30-4:30pm

One of the post-9/11 books published in the twelve months following the September 11, 2001 attacks carried the title ‘The Day that Shook the World’ (BBC 2001). This title explicitly recalls the 1975 film of the same name, the ‘day’ then being the 1914 assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, which led to World War I. The BBC thus positioned 9/11 as an event with the same implication that the whole world was affected.
Which world? All of it? Some of it? How was it ‘shaken’? Was it all ‘shaken’ in the same way? And how do we define ‘the world’ anyway? What of the women in this shaken world? How did 9/11 affect them? Did it affect them? Why, or why not?

These questions lie at the basis of Dr. Winter’s next book, of which she will give an overview in this talk. She necessarily looks at sites that are not usually considered in analyses of post-9/11ism to see how post- 9/11ist politics may or may not have played out and what traces those politics leave today.

Bronwyn Winter is based in the Department of French Studies at the University of Sydney. Her research focuses on gender and sexual orientation in relation to religion, ethnicity, the state, violence, international rights frameworks and transnational social movements.

Light refreshments  served. RSVP to  juliapyr@yorku.ca.

Please note this talk counts towards seminar credit for GFWS students.

[6] Lecture- Dr. Tirso Gonzales- Indigenous Peoples & Neotropical Conservation: South American Andean Indigenous Emerging Paradigms on Bio-cultural Landscapes in the Context of Climate Change- York University- November 26, 2014 

Wednesday, November 26, 2014
Private Dining Room – Schulich Executive Learning Centre
4:30 – 6:30 pm

Lecture Description:
National and international strategies concerning climate change, biodiversity, and food security have failed to include the perspectives of Indigenous communities to address these challenges. How can we include the perspectives of Indigenous Peoples in national and international strategies concerning the aforesaid issues? How can we make Indigenous communities strategic, local and global, partners in the development and implementation of regional and national strategies on the above key issues. This lecture aims to encourage and explore the establishment of an inter/intra-cultural research platform for the purposes of: 1) identifying of Indigenous paradigms and the development of Indigenous theories and methodologies, and 2) building capacity within research institutions to form or enhance partnerships, and provide training and skill development and 3) developing policy proposals that validate and support the generation of indigenous community knowledge. In particular, this lecture is expected to provide insights essential for stakeholders’ work (Canadian university research centres and international development agencies) on food security, biodiversity conservation, climate change adaptation in the Central Andes (Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia), and the role of Canadian Aboriginal communities in this strategizing.

Speaker Biography :
Tirso Gonzales, is Peruvian and of indigenous Aymara descent. Currently he teaches at the Indigenous Studies Program, University of British Columbia Okanagan. His area of expertise is Indigenous Knowledge; Indigenous Agricultures/Medicinal Plants and Community Based Biodiversity Conservation, Food Security and Climate Change strategies. He has actively participated for three years in and contributed to the Global and Sub Global "International Assessment on the Role of Science, Knowledge and Technology for Agriculture, IAASTD." He has a rich 20-year experience working with South American Andean Indigenous Communities, has participated at major international scientific conferences on Indigenous and Local knowledge as well as in major international indigenous events on Indigenous knowledge, paradigms, and epistemologies. His work as a scholar, international consultant and activist has allowed him to work closely with Indigenous Peoples in the Americas. His current work explores the use of indigenous and non-indigenous research methodologies and techniques on issues central to self-determined indigenous development. He is committed to supporting the agenda of Indigenous Peoples as well as processes related to indigenous ecological knowledge, cultural affirmation and decolonization.

[7] Lecture- Stefano Tijerina- Canadian Imperialism: The History of the Extractive Industry in Colombia- York University- November 27, 2014 

Thursday, November 27, 2014
York Lanes Room 280N
3:00 – 5:00 pm

Abstract:
Private sector interests and matters of political economy have historically shaped the relationship between Canada and Colombia.  Mining of gold in the Antioquia region under Canadian subsidiaries brought the two nations together during the later part of the 19th century, followed by the extraction of oil along the Magdalena River in the early 20th century under another set of subsidiaries.  These early political economic relations driven by private sector interests declined as a result of the imperial struggle over the control of Colombian resources during the interwar period.  It would take Canadian and Colombian diplomatic, trade, commercial, and development institutions another fifty years to reconstruct the levels of exchange achieved during the earlier part of the 20th century.  Today Canada is one of the top five supplies of foreign investment to the Colombian economy; and today Canadian mining, oil, paper, and telecommunications companies control large part of the Colombian economy.  Mining and oil, as in the past, are once again shaping the bilateral relation but in this case it seems that they are there to stay, at least until the resource is depleted.

I argue in this talk that the present day presence of Canadian private interests in Colombia have taken a more imperialist tone, as Canadian companies try to secure resources across the globe for the sake of global investors and top shareholders.  Canadian oil and mining corporations have replicated models in Colombia and in other parts of Latin America that were once exclusive to American corporations, including the use of local military and paramilitary forces and other intimidation tactics as means to secure resources and displace local populations from strategic geographical areas.  I argue that recent bilateral agreements at the national level such as the recently signed Free Trade Agreement represent structural and system mechanisms designed to guarantee an extractive relation that favors foreign interests, in this case Canadian private interests.  Finally, a replication of the same phenomena across the Western Hemisphere, from Maine to Argentina, goes to show that the strategy is transnational and not regional or local.  Ultimately my talk will try to illustrate that the current realities of Canadian-Colombian relations are just a representative case study of the magnitude of power and flexibility of the transnational corporations that are shaping and constructing this current reality we call “globalization.”

[8] Sex Salon- Zoë Newman, David Seitz, Shawna Carroll- University of Toronto- November 27, 2014

Sex Salon
Thursday November 27, 2014  4-6 pm
Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies
University College- Room 240,
University of Toronto

Zoë Newman, York University
The Spectacle of Public Sex: Media and State Surveillance of Gay Men in Toronto, 1977
In August of 1977, a young boy, Emanuel Jaques, was found murdered, apparently on the roof of a sex shop on Yonge Street, one of Toronto's main strips. According to newspapers from the time, Yonge had grown increasingly seedy, reportedly because of the presence of massage parlours, and sex workers. Contemporaneously, Toronto lesbian and gay communities were becoming increasingly organized and visible just blocks away. There had also been considerable debate that spring about recommendations to include protection of ‘homosexuals’ in the Human Rights Code; public responses included expressions of anxiety that ‘homosexuals’ might be allowed to be teachers, perverting innocent young children. With these various events in mind, I examine the newspaper discourses framing the Jaques murder, including a "Clean Up Yonge Street” campaign that soon followed, to consider how links were forged to tie Jaques’s murder to spatial disorder and sexual deviance, beginning anew the process of justifying media as well as police surveillance of gay men, and displacing them from areas of the city that they occupied. Through this case, I also examine the aggregate relationship of formal and informal modes of surveillance as processes of knowing, which mark some bodies as suspect, circumscribing their access to public participation.

David Seitz, University of Toronto
“Limbo Life”: Queer Precarity in Canada’s Waiting Room
This paper proposes the waiting room as a key material and metaphorical space in the everyday geographies of refugee claimants in Canada. The waiting room is not an unfamiliar figure in critical scholarship. Historian Dipesh Chakrabarty challenges Eurocentric historiography for framing Europe as sole proprietor of progress, consigning the global South to the "waiting-room of history.” Queer theorist David Eng critiques "queer liberal" framings of sexual identity that privilege visibility and progress, and dismiss queer diasporic subjects as mired in the closet – another waiting room. This paper adds geographical and empirical dimensions to critical scholarship on the waiting room, reflecting on fieldwork with people seeking asylum in Canada from persecution based on sexual orientation and gender identity. Time spent with refugee claimants in the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada waiting room in downtown Toronto illuminated claimants' insights about their liminal, haunted, and precarious everyday geographies. The waiting room thus offers a prism for understanding how state violence, particularly the xenophobic discourse of the "bogus refugee," (re)produces precarity. Yet it simultaneously offers a departure point for critical politics of solidarity, as LGBTQ groups stand with refugee claimants not based on "authentic" shared identity, but in response to state violence.

Shawna Carroll, University of Toronto
The Queer Body in the Space of the English Secondary Classroom and Curriculum
This paper will look at the ways in which the ‘queer body’ is produced, negotiated, and contested in the Ontario English secondary school curriculum and classroom. Looking at how the queer body is different from the queer person, the author shows how the classroom space is regulated by the settler colonial ideologies embedded within the Ontario English curriculum. The author uses an autoethnographical approach to reflect and analyze the affective knowledges within the classroom space. Utilizing Lefebvre’s (1991) “conceptual triad” of spatial analysis and Kawash’s (1998) analysis of the body versus the person, the author examines the ways in which the queer body is produced, negotiated and contested in the curriculum and classroom. The author concludes that the English classroom within the Ontario secondary school she attended reinforces settler colonial ideologies to imagine a specific queer body.

Biographies
Zoë Newman’s research and teaching investigate places where constructions of gender, race, and sexuality shape each other and meet up with ideas about citizenship, neoliberalism, and public space. She is engaged in ongoing work on public celebrations like Pride and Caribana/Carnival and the multiple and ambivalent meanings of spectacle.

David K. Seitz is a Ph.D. candidate in Human Geography, Women and Gender Studies, and Sexual Diversity Studies at the University of Toronto. His dissertation explores concepts and practices of citizenship within and beyond the nation-state and identity politics at a predominantly LGBT church in Toronto.

Shawna Carroll is a second year PhD student at OISE/UofT and a creative anti-colonial, feminist poet. She is interested in the oppression people negotiate due to the ongoing colonization of ‘Canada’, through a post-structural lens. Shawna is hoping to research the ways in which female-identified LGBTQ2SI folks negotiate their subjectivities in the settler colonial Ontario education system through the literature they read.

The Sex Salon is an internal speakers series at the University of Toronto, presented by the Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies. The Salon provides a forum for faculty and graduate students at the University of Toronto, Fellows, and friends of the Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies, to exchange ideas and share research pertaining to queer, GLBTQI2 and critical sexuality studies.

For more information about the series please contact Mary Bunch at mary.bunch@utoronto.ca.

Mary Bunch
Postdoctoral Fellow, Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies
University of Toronto

[9] Event- The Renaissance Woman: Celebrating the Life and Leadership of Dr. Maya Angelou- Toronto- November 27, 2014

The Renaissance Woman: Celebrating the Life and Leadership of Dr. Maya Angelou

Thursday, 27 November, 2014

6:00 pm – 8:30 pm

CWSE (Room 2-225) at OISE

252 Bloor St. West, Toronto

Presented by the Canadian Academy for Diversity Leadership (CADL)

With the support of the Centre for Women's Studies in Education (CWSE)

Maya Angelou, a mentor, mother/sister, friend, sheroe, author, poet, artist, teacher, black political civil rights activist, literary writer, educator, novelist, actor, film maker, producer, dancer, voice, essayist, historian, storyteller, singer, performer, calypsonian, griot, change agent, womanist and feminist passed awayWednesday, May 28, 2014 at the age of 86. As civil rights and social justice activists, the African Canadian community and friends will join in celebrating what we learned from Dr. Maya Angelou’s activism and its effects on the rest of the world. Through the celebration of the life and leadership of Dr. Maya Angelou, we will recognize her importance in leadership, women’s empowerment and as a champion of human rights.

We invite civil rights and social justice activists, artists, academics, friends, students, individuals and groups to participate in the celebration of her life and leadership.

To contribute articles, presentations, poems, paintings/artworks, reviews, songs, dance, drumming, commentaries, pictures, etc. for the celebration of Dr. Maya Angelou’s life and leadership, contact Dr. Marilyn Patricia Johncilla (organizer/facilitator) at thedoc@drmarilynj.com no later than tomorrow, Saturday, 22nd November, 2014.

We are also looking for Sponsors and Volunteers to assist in the production of this event.

[10] Film Premiere- African Grandmothers Tribunal: Seeking Justice at the Frontlines of the AIDS crisis- Toronto- November 27, 2014

The Stephen Lewis Foundation is proud to invite you to the Toronto premiere of our new film:
African Grandmothers Tribunal:
Seeking justice at the frontlines of the AIDS crisis
Thursday, November 27th
Doors open at 6:30 PM — Film begins at 7 PM
The Bloor Hot Docs Cinema
(506 Bloor St. West)

In honour of World AIDS Day, join us afterwards for an engaging panel discussion moderated by Anna Maria Tremonti, host of CBC Radio One’s The Current. Panelists include Stephen Lewis (SLF Chair & Co-Founder), Joy Phumaphi (Executive Secretary of the African Leaders Malaria Alliance) and Justine Ojambo (National Director, Phoebe Education Fund for Orphans, Uganda).

TICKETS
Tickets are $15 and are going quickly! They are available for purchase here:: http://bit.ly/1sjsNzK

ABOUT THE FILM
The grandmothers of Africa have watched their own children — an entire generation of young adults — die of AIDS. As a result, grandmothers have become the primary caregivers for millions of orphaned grandchildren. This moving new documentary from the Stephen Lewis Foundation shines a light on the urgent need to provide better protection for the human rights of African grandmothers.
This film centres on the SLF's African Grandmothers Tribunal, held in Vancouver, BC in 2013. The film begins in Africa, highlighting six of these courageous grandmothers as they give powerful and emotional testimony before the tribunal judges: Gloria Steinem, Joy Phumaphi, Theo Sowa and Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond — culminating in a passionate call to action.
To watch the film trailer, please visit: stephenlewisfoundation.org/tribunalfilm

If you’d like more information or if you’d be interested in hosting a screening of the film or using it in a class, please don’t hesitate to be in touch with me.

Thank you,
Healy Thompson
Outreach Officer
Stephen Lewis Foundation
260 Spadina Ave., Suite 501
Toronto, ON M5T 2E4
Tel: 416-533-9292 ext. 306
Toll Free: 1-888-203-9990
Fax: 416-850-4910
www.stephenlewisfoundation.org

The Stephen Lewis Foundation (SLF) works with community-level organizations that are turning the tide of HIV/AIDS in Africa by providing care and support to women, children orphaned by AIDS, grandmothers, and people living with HIV and AIDS. Visit www.stephenlewisfoundation.org to learn more.

[11] Film- Huicholes: The Last Peyote Guardians- York University- November 27, 2014

CINEMA POLITICA (YORK UNIVERSITY) PRESENTS
HUICHOLES
THE LAST PEYOTE GUARDIANS

THURS NOV 27 at 7pm • MIRKOPOLIS SCREENING ROOM, ACCOLADE EAST 004

Join filmmaker Hernan Vilchez and two shaman/activists featured in this award-winning feature documentary for an unforgettable screening/discussion. HUICHOLES tells the story of the Wixarika people and their struggle against the Mexican government and Canadian mining companies to preserve Wirikuta, their most sacred territory and the land where the peyote grows. Introduced by Alberto Guevara, York Professor in Theatre, theatre/film artist, co-editor of InTensions.

[12] CCV Workshop- SSHRC Insight Development Grant Competition- York University- November 28, 2014 OR December 17, 2014

What:  A hands on introductory workshop where researchers will have an opportunity to create/update their CCV in advance of the SSHRC Insight Development Grant competition. Research support staff are also welcome to attend.

When:

Session 1:  November 28th 2014 at 2:30pm

Session 2:  December 17th 2014 at 11am

Where: For the November 28th session, please RSVP no later than Friday, November 21st at noon and for the December 17th session, please RSVP no later than Friday December 12th at noon.  Send RSVP’s to Emma Yuen (emmay@yorku.ca).  Location and additional instructions will be sent out after the RSVP deadline date.  Note that both sessions will cover the same material so you should only register for one.

The Office of Research Services has been advised by SSHRC that the upcoming February 2015 Insight Development Grant competition will again require applicants to use the CCV instead of the standard SSHRC CV that has been used in the past.  Should you have questions about the CCV or would like some guidance in creating/updating your CCV then please RSVP to attend one of the ORS workshops.

[13] Panel- 2014 Toronto Election: Implications for Politics & Social Justice in the Inner Suburbs- York University- December 1, 2014

The City Institute at York University (CITY) presents:

2014 Toronto Election: Implications for Politics & Social Justice in the Inner Suburbs

Socio-economic inequity continues to grow for many residents of Northern Etobicoke, Scarborough and North York, exacerbated by a lack of public transit and other social services. Meanwhile, conservative politicians and their politics remain ascendant in these communities and in most of the city. This panel of academics, community activists and emerging politicians will consider these dynamics, and the steps that could be taken towards a more socially just city.

Moderator and Panelists:

  • Jane Farrow (Moderator) 2014 Candidate for City Councillor in Ward 30 Toronto-Danforth
  • Paul Bocking 2014 Candidate for City Councillor in Ward 35 Scarborough Southwest & PhD Candidate, Geography, York University
  • Munira Abukar 2014 Candidate for City Councillor in Ward 2 Etobicoke North
  • Amarjeet Chhabra 2014 Candidate for City Councillor in Ward 44 Scarborough East
  • Professor Stefan Kipfer Environmental Studies, York University
  • Professor Roger Keil Environmental Studies, York University
  • Parastou Saberi PhD Candidate, Environmental Studies, York University
  • Nigel Barriffe Elementary Teacher & Community Activist in Rexdale, Etobicoke North NDP Candidate in 2014 Ontario Election

Monday December 1, 2014

3:30pm - 5:30pm

Room 280N, York Lanes

York University

Everyone is welcome.

[14] Documentary Screening-  Gulabi Gang- Toronto- December 2, 2014

GULABI GANG
This impeccably shot film follows a group of fearless women who fight gender violence in India with great ferocity.
WHAT: Documentary screening of GULABI GANG with director Nishtha Jain in attendance!
WHERE: Bloor Hot Docs Cinema, 506 Bloor Street West
WHEN: Tuesday, December 2, 6:15 pm
COST: Suggested $5-10
INFO: cinemapolitica.org/bloor
SOCIAL MEDIA: Facebook Event
Co-presented with Shameless Magazine and Cléo: A Journal of Film and Feminism. Thank-you as well to our series co-sponsor, POV Magazine.
GULABI GANG
Nishtha Jain / Norway-India-Denmark / 2012 / 96 ' / Hindi / S.T. English
SYNOPSIS: Enter the badlands of Bundelkhand in central India and you have entered a place of desolation, dust and despair. And yet it is hope that we discover as we follow the pink sari-clad women of Gulabi Gang. These women travel long distances by cart and tractor, bus and train, to wrest justice for women and Dalits, undeterred by sneering policemen and condescending bureaucrats.
Sampat Pal, their leader, is a rough-and-tough woman with a commanding personality. Despite her lack of education she has evolved her own brand of feminism and egalitarian politics. Her strength lies in her words. She is constantly on the move – today investigating a young woman’s suspicious death, tomorrow protesting against a corrupt official.
The gang encounters resistance everywhere – whole villages connive in protecting the perpetrators of violence. As the film pulls us into the centre of these blazing conflicts, it uncovers a complex story, disturbing yet heartening.
Click this link for more info on this screening event.

[15] Talk- AJ Withers- Invisible Austerity, Neo-Liberalism and Disability- York University- December 3, 2014

The Critical Disability Studies Student Association Presents

A Talk with AJ Withers:

Invisible Austerity, Neo-Liberalism and Disability

Wednesday December 3rd @ 3pm

in 1156 Vari

http://cdssa.wordpress.com/

*Snacks and refreshments will be served*

Vegan and gluten-free options will be available

1156 Vari is wheelchair accessible

Please contact Natalie for ASL interpretation and other accommodations :nspagnuo@yorku.ca

CALLS

[1] Allies- Coalition of Allies- Sex Worker Safety

Hello! As many of you already know, I have been helping to assemble a coalition to fight Bill C-36 at the provincial level. Spearheaded by NOW Magazine in Toronto, this project is answering a call for solidarity by Terri-Jean Bedford.

In this story posted on NOW Magazine today, I explain the grassroots initiative, led by sex workers and sex worker rights advocates. http://nowtoronto.com/news/feds-new-prostitution-law-raises-safety-issues/

It's a simple request. Sex workers and allies have started a letter-writing campaign asking Premier Kathleen Wynne to refer the law to the Ontario Court of Appeal to evaluate the law's constitutionality. Wynne is also being urged to instruct provincial crown attorneys not to enforce the law. As Bedford writes in her open letter, all this is within her power.

"This bill is an assault on the entire sex work community," advocate Nikki Thomas writes in her open letter to Wynne. "We have done our best to share our stories, and we have raised our concerns, put forward mountains of evidence, and made every possible effort to have our voices heard. But we have been dismissed, ignored, and deemed unworthy of contributing to an issue that will affect us in the most fundamental ways."

We are now asking you to join us.

If you are a member of a union, women's rights group, LGBT group or any social justice group, send them this link, and ask them to stand with us.

A growing list of allies will soon be released. (We are still working on creating a petition-style page on NOW). Many of you have already confirmed, and for that, I give you my sincere thanks for not hesitating in offering support.

Right now, if you have not done so yet, please take a moment to write to Wynne, ask her to intervene, and spread the word. A letter template can be found in the story: http://nowtoronto.com/news/feds-new-prostitution-law-raises-safety-issues/

If you have contacts in her office, please try to reach out to her, request a meeting and explain the urgency of this.

If you tweet, spread the word, and be sure to tag @Kathleen_Wynne. Here's her snail mail contacts: https://correspondence.premier.gov.on.ca/en/feedback/default.aspx

Andrea Houston
NOW Magazine
M: 647-210-4655
Twitter: @dreahouston

[2] Paper- Conference- Women and Tax Justice at Beijing+20: Taxing and Budgeting for Sex Equality

Feminist Legal Studies Queen's & Women for Tax Justice & FemTax
International --

CALL FOR STUDENT PAPERS to be presented at the upcoming conference

"Women and Tax Justice at Beijing+20: Taxing and Budgeting for Sex Equality"

Celebrating International Women’s Day 2015 and the 20th Anniversary of the Beijing Platform for Action

March 6-7, 2015
Faculty of Law, Queen's University
Kingston, Ontario, Canada

Graduate and undergraduate students and new scholars working in any institutional context who are doing research related to economic gender equality, gender budget issues, revenues for human rights, tax policy or law, Indigenous economic development and gender, the gender impact of tax haven and offshoring policies, financing for development, oils/mining/gas revenue issues, IMF, World Bank, and/or EU conditionalities, cultural analysis of fiscal discourses, or related topics are invited to submit paper proposals for the upcoming 'developing scholars' program at the Women and Tax Justice/International Women's Day conference being held on March 6 at Queen's University Faculty of Law. Those participating in the March 6 program will be automatically registered for the remainder of the March 6-7 program.

Travel and accommodation funding will be available for a limited number of speakers. Preference will be given to those addressing developing and emerging economy country issues.

Further details can be found at http://femlaw.queensu.ca/index/FLSQ2015ConfCallOc82014.pdf

This call contemplates interdisciplinary submissions from students at any level, in any type of program, from scholars new to this research domain (whether new academics or experienced scholars) working in any type of institutional unit (academic, government, nongovernmental,
community groups, other).

Sample topics include basic questions such as -- * what government or social programs need to be funded, and why? * what discriminatory tax laws or economic policies need to be changed, and why?

Thank you for your consideration!

Kathleen Lahey and Bita Amani, Co-directors,
Feminist Legal Studies
Queen's Faculty of Law,
cross-appointed Gender Studies, and Cultural Studie

[3] Abstract- Conference- Maternal Subjectivities: Psychology/Psychoanalysis, Literature, Culture and the Arts- deadline December 1, 2014

CONFERENCE CALL FOR PAPERS

Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community Involvement (MIRCI)

MATERNAL SUBJECTIVITIES: PSYCHOLOGY/PSYCHOANALYSIS, LITERATURE, CULTURE AND THE ARTS

Rome, Italy

April 23-24, 2015

Casa Internazionale delle donne

Via della Lungara 19 - 00165 Roma

www.casainternazionaledelledonne.org

We welcome submissions from scholars, students, artists, mothers and others who research in this area. Cross-cultural and comparative work is encouraged. We are open to a variety of submissions including academic papers from all disciplines and creative submissions including visual art, literature, and performance art.

Topics may include but are not restricted to:

Maternal subjectivities in intersectional, global contexts; maternal ambivalence; mothers/mothering in literature; mothers and sons/daughters; representations of the maternal; mother love; psychoanalytic theory on/of mothers; mothers and psychotherapy; counselling approaches specific to mothers; maternal mental health and wellness; psychological processes in becoming a mother; mother's panopticon, attachment to and separation from mother; developmental stages as seen by classic theorists and the constraints of those models; feminist developmental models; feminist critique of the 'psy' discourses in relation to maternal subjectivities; feminist critiques of psychoanalysis/psychology/psychotherapy; mothering as reflexive practice; matroreform, feminist counselling; the social construction of mothers; images of mothers; mother blame/mother guilt; countertransference therapist-mother to client-mother; object relations theory; theories and theorists of maternal subjectivities (Melanie Klein, Helene Deutsch, Karen Horney, Luce Irigaray, Julia Kristeva, Nancy Chodorow, Jessica Benjamin, Joan Raphael-Leff, Daphne de Marneffe, Lisa Baraitser, Alison Stone); queering/queer maternal subjectivities;  'bad' mothering;  feminist/empowered mothering;  maternal subjectivities and disabilities; and maternal subjectivities in an historical context.

If you are interested in being considered as a presenter, please send a 200 word abstract and a

50-word bio by December 1, 2014 to aoreilly@yorku.ca

** TO SUBMIT AN ABSTRACT FOR THIS CONFERENCE, ONE MUST BE A 2015 MEMBER OF MIRCI

http://www.motherhoodinitiative.org/membership.html

Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community Involvement (MIRCI)

140 Holland St. West, PO Box 13022, Bradford, ON, L3Z 2Y5 (905) 775-9089http://www.motherhoodinitiative.org  info@motherhoodinitiative.org

[4] Submission- Conference- Critical Ethnic Studies Association Conference/Gathering- deadline December 15, 2014

From April 30 - May 3, 2015, York University will be hosting the Critical Ethnic Studies Association Conference/Gathering. This international gathering aims to critique settler colonialism and white supremacy; challenge colonial gender binaries; examine genealogies of anti-Black racism and colonial racial formations; and think about resistance and oppression transnationally, in ways that challenge western hegemony and the travels of racist and colonial methods.

We invite contributions in all kinds of  presentation formats that encourage participation, collaboration, and creativity. Proposals may include performances, interactive workshops, open discussions, roundtables, films, activist studios, academic papers, panels, strategy sessions, learning labs, writing salons, and others. We encourage submissions by community members, social justice organizers, cultural workers, activists, students, academics, independent scholars, teachers, media makers, human rights advocates, and anyone interested in analyzing the conditions of our work, lives, and struggles.

We invite panel, interactive workshop, and individual paper submissions on a wide range of topics that may include, but are not limited to, the conference theme.   We seek proposals that explore local and global forms of imperialism, white supremacy, and colonialism—and challenge neoliberal policies and legacies of slavery, confront ableism, and unsettle hetero-patriarchy by forging new theoretical and practical conversations.

The deadline to submit a proposal is December 15, 2014. click here to submit your proposal today: http://criticalethnicstudies.us7.list-manage.com/track/click?u=63732d131a563864c821247ed&id=1fdae94b2f&e=9eb301e7a5

[5] Contributions- Conference for Critical Ethnic Studies- Sovereignties and Colonialisms: Resisting Racism, Extraction and Dispossession- deadline December 15, 2014

Sovereignties and Colonialisms: Resisting Racism, Extraction and Dispossession

Call for contributions for Critical Ethnic Studies Conference

April 30-May 3, 2015

York University, Toronto

Deadline for proposals: December 15, 2014

Submit a proposal here https://www.criticalethnicstudies.org/content/conference-information

The 2015 conference of the Critical Ethnic Studies Association honours Indigenous sovereignty struggles for land, culture, food, water, education, and health—and centres Indigenous, Black, and people of colour activism and scholarship, especially work coming from feminist, trans, Two-Spirit, queer, and disability struggles and perspectives.

This international gathering aims to critique settler colonialism and white supremacy; challenge colonial gender binaries; examine genealogies of anti-Black racism and colonial racial formations; and think about resistance and oppression transnationally, in ways that challenge western hegemony and the travels of racist and colonial methods.

This gathering brings African, Caribbean, Equity, Diaspora, Critical Race, Native, Trans, and Disability Studies into conversation with Ethnic Studies to critique genocide, racialized sexual violence, and capitalism; and to engage with conditions of borders, land, migration, displacement, labour, prisons, war, development, occupation, ableism, racism, and apartheid.

Relationships as Resistance: A Gathering for Activists, Academics, and Agitators

This gathering will de-centre white supremacy by focusing on relationships between Indigenous peoples, Black, migrant, refugee, and Mestiz@ communities, and settlers.

We will give back to local Indigenous communities by taking a reciprocity and responsibility approach through organizing beyond the acknowledgement of territory and the inclusion of Indigenous peoples, and moving towards deepening relationships, knowledges, and strategies for change between Indigenous peoplesand communities of colour.

We recognize the fundamental role of anti-Black racism in contemporary institutions, economies, and social movements, including ethnic studies and other academic spaces. We aim to disrupt anti-Blackness in antiracist and other anti-oppressive spaces, which are frequently appropriative of Blackness and complicit with anti-Blackness.

We recognize that racism, colonialism and imperialism take different shapes globally, and are mediated through specific state contexts. We invite you to help build a space where colonized and racialized peoples in different parts of the global north and south treat each other as enmeshed, relational, and interdependent.

We seek submissions that explore local and global forms of imperialism, white supremacy, and colonialism—and challenge neoliberal policies and legacies of slavery, confront ableism, and unsettle hetero-patriarchy by forging new theoretical and practical conversations.

We encourage proposals by community members, social justice organizers, cultural workers, activists, students, academics, independent scholars, teachers, media makers, human rights advocates, and anyone interested in analyzing the conditions of our work, lives, and struggles.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  •      Health, Disability and Disablement
  •      Land Defense and Environmental Justice
  •      Reproductive Justice
  •      Food Sovereignty
  •      Incarceration, Criminalization, and State Violence
  •      Global Imperialisms, Racisms and Colonialism
  •      Canadian State and Settler Colonialism
  •      Education
  •      Borders
  •      Labour
  •      Activism
  •      Art, Culture, and Media

We recommend presentation formats that encourage participation, collaboration, and creativity. Proposals may include performances, interactive workshops, open discussions, roundtables, films, activist studios, papers, panels, strategy sessions, learning labs, writing salons, and others.

We will prioritize proposals by people doing critical work in their own communities, and proposals that take care not to reproduce “expert” colonial knowledges. We welcome proposals that support participation for various abilities, bodies, learning styles, and experiences.

Submissions for non-translated sessions in languages other than English are welcome, and we will work with you to explore possibilities for translation if desired. ASL interpretation, wheelchair access, and gender-neutral washrooms will be available.

[6] Abstracts- Conference- (In)dependency and its Tensions: Democracy, Culture and (Post)Development- deadline January 15, 2015

CALL FOR PAPERS
York University's Centre for Research on Latin America and the Caribbean (CERLAC) is hosting its

4th International Graduate Student Research Conference

(In)dependency and its Tensions: Democracy, Culture and (Post)Development

May 1 and 2 @ York University
Toronto, Canada

This conference brings together scholars working on the Americas to share their research in a collegial, professional and friendly environment. We are seeking a broad range of proposals; critical, engaging, diverse, and dynamic themes that span across various disciplines including, but not limited to, social sciences, humanities, environmental studies, the arts, education, law, and business. Themes from previous conferences include indigeneity, literature, inter-state relations, knowledge and power, violence, identity, language, development, gender, fair trade, diaspora, memory, Latin American and Caribbean thinking, and neoliberalism.

This year the conference emphasis is on building critical thinking that addresses the structures of (in)dependency at multiple levels--socio-political, economic, and cultural-- for the hemisphere. For a long time, an imaginary of enduring dependency prevailed in and about Latin America and the Caribbean. The last two decades give signs of both emancipation and the persistence of subordinations. This conference will host panels that explore their topics in the light of the North-South relations problematizing and /or proposing new approaches to this geographical divide.

Abstracts must be 300 words maximum and can be submitted in English, French, Portuguese, or Spanish by January 15, 2015. We strongly encourage applicants to present panels instead of individual submissions.

CERLAC is a York University-based hub for inter- and multidisciplinary research on Latin America and the Caribbean, their diasporas, and their relations with Canada and the rest of the world. It provides a meeting space for faculty, students, and visitors to discover common interests; supports their projects by facilitating grant administration, partnership formation, and the co-production and sharing of knowledge; and trains new generations of regional scholars. Recognized since its founding in 1978 as the preeminent LAC research body in Canada, CERLAC furthers York’s mandate for excellence in international and community- engaged research by producing high-quality, socially progressive scholarship in collaboration with partners throughout the Americas and close to home. Crossing boundaries between North and South and building bridges between the university and its constituents, CERLAC grounds critical reflection on Canada’s role in its hemisphere.

Contact/Submissions: yorkucerlac@gmail.com

Languages: We are accepting submissions in English, French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Deadline for submission of abstracts and panel proposals is January 15, 2015

Applicants will receive confirmation of acceptance by February 15, 2015

To confirm participation, accepted presenters will be asked to submit their papers - or a near-final draft by March 31, 2015

[7] Manuscripts- Journal- Reconstituting Race in Youth Studies- deadline April 30, 2014

Reconstituting Race in Youth Studies: Special Edition Open Call for Papers YOUNG (Nordic Journal of Youth Research)

Posted by weekscentre on 23/09/2014

The relationship between youth and race is undergoing significant social change. Many urban centres are becoming more ethnically diverse and youthful. Youth culture has been digitally globalised and new forms of marginalisation and racialisation have arisen. Despite this, in the last fifteen years there has been relatively little empirical work conducted in youth studies on how race and youth are being reconstituted.

While some cognate areas of research such as education studies and cultural studies have maintained a focus on race and ethnicity, in youth studies more widely race has been comparatively absent. Where considerations of race or ethnicity have featured, youth studies has tended to focus on (im)migration, super-diversity and understandings of identities that essentialise and flatten the ways in which race and racism intertwines into young people’s lives.

Building a bridge back to studies from 1990s and 2000s (in particular work on new ethnicities, urban multiculture, young adulthood and structural disadvantage), this special issue seeks to update theoretical, empirical and methodological understandings of race in relation to youth. It aims to reconstitute race in youth studies and in so doing demonstrate how, and in what ways, race remains a salient and necessary dimension of social analysis.

Aims: The aims of this special edition are four-fold:

To address the relation between increased ethnic diversity, racialisation and youth

Recent studies have noted the increase in ethnic diversity in many urban areas, and the particular registering of this diversity among the young (CoDE 2013ONS 2001Vertovec 2006). These contemporary demographics are significantly different from those of the 1980s and 1990s when prominent studies on the relation between ethnic diversity, racialisation and youth culture were conducted (Back 1994Bennett 1999Gilroy 1987Jones 1988Nayak 2003). This transforming relationship between race and youth therefore no longer fully corresponds to prior frameworks. It merits renewed exploration and theorisation.

To address new structures of racial marginalisation and their intersection with class, gender and sexuality

Alongside the ethnic reconfiguration of young lives, new structures of marginality are in play. We are witnessing ‘new hierarchies of belonging’, and ‘new racisms’ (Back et al. 2012), where ethnic minorities from long term settled communities and new migrants are positioned within a ‘racial reordering’ and are differentially ‘included’. Integral to this differentiated process of racialisation and marginalisation is the intersection of gender, class and sexuality which enable the appropriation and reproduction of racial signifiers (Kulz 2014Skeggs 2004). Post-subcultural studies, very little attention has been paid to these debates in youth studies (Carrington and Wilson 2004). Studies have tended to convey a ‘post-race’ sociality (Böse 2003), rather than engaging with how young lives are being racially reordered in relation to other vectors of power and marginalisation.

To address global youth culture and attendant negotiations of race

Alongside these demographic and structural changes, youth culture has globalised, and along with it the forms of racial symbolism that young people use to make sense of their lives. In the last fifteen years, racial signifiers of youth culture have slipped their moorings. Previous studies that addressed the exchange of cultural symbols between white and black youth did so in a time before baggy jeans, hooded tops, break beats and urban vernaculars had become mainstream and globally commercialised (Back, 1994; Hewitt, 1986; Jones, 1988). Alongside increased ethnic diversity and new forms of marginalisation, these shifts demand revised approaches to youth and race in global and local contexts.

To explore the relation between digital and virtual communications, race and youth

Finally, the sites at which these negotiations take place have shifted. Whereas previous studies focused on the analogue (sound systems and LP records) and physical (the built environment) dimensions of youth culture (Back 1994Gilroy 1987), the proliferation of digital technologies and virtual communication has shifted the times and spaces in which youth and race are constituted and communicated (Murthy 2008Odin 1997). While this has been addressed at a general level (Madianou and Miller 2013), in relation to gender (Ringrose et al. 2012), and in relation to the racialisation of social media (Sharma 2013) the implications for digital and virtual communications on race and youth have yet to be fully explored.

Indicative topics include, but are not limited to, the following themes:

New racisms and racialisation;

Everyday racisms and youth transitions to adulthood;

Negotiations, resistances and youth politics;

Digital and virtual cultures;

Creative arts and music scenes;

Performativity;

New migrations;

Intersectionality and the re-ordering of social hierarchies;

Convivialities and dialogues;

Mixing, mixedness and syncretism;

Diasporic and global youth cultures;

Scope: The special issue will cover a broad range of themes and empirical, methodological and theoretical contributions. The articles will represent research projects that have incorporated a variety of methodological approaches, including ethnographic, visual and sonic methods. The issue will incorporate articles that collectively have an international scope. Some of the articles could also adopt a comparative approach across different countries or cities within a country. Overall the papers will work together as a means to pull out the role of particular contextual, cultural, social, economic and political factors in shaping people’s experiences and negotiations of race and its intersection with youth, gender, class and sexuality.

The special edition will contain five articles of 5000-8000 words with a separate 3-5,000 word introduction written by the editors.

Submission: Manuscripts should be submitted in electronic form online at http:/journalpro.fi/journals/young

Start the procedure by clicking the REGISTER button. We only accept articles (in English) that have not been published elsewhere and that have been anonymised.

References in both the text and end notes should follow Harvard style whereby references should be cited in the text as (author, date: page) and an alphabetical references section follows the text.

Deadline for papers: The deadline for submissions for this special edition is 30st April 2015

Guest editors:

The Guest Editors would be Bethan Harries, Sumi Hollingworth and Malcolm James.

Responsible journal editor: Katrine Fangen

Bethan Harries is a post-doctoral researcher in the ESRC Centre on Dynamics of Ethnicity and is an associate editor for the journal, Migration Ethnicity Race Online. Her research focuses on the lived experience of racism and ethnicity and engages with representations of geographical patterns of inequalities and the social, cultural and historical conditions in which these are produced. She has contributed to a book on citizenship and written a number of policy-oriented reports on race and inequality. Most recently she has published a paper in Sociology entitled ‘We need to talk about race’.

Sumi Hollingworth is a senior research fellow at the Weeks Centre for Social and Policy Research, London South Bank University. She is a sociologist of youth and education and is interested in social class, race, and gender inequalities in young people’s education and work transitions. She is co-author of Urban Youth and Schooling (OU Press, 2010) and has published widely in peer reviewed journals across sociology, youth studies, education and geography. She has research interests in the white middle classes and privilege and has published on this topic, including in the Journal of Youth Studies. Her doctoral research is about social mixing among youth in London schools and she has recently won the British Sociological Association SAGE Prize 2012 for Excellence and Innovation for her paper in Sociological Research Online on the topic. Sumi has recently co-guest edited a Special Issue of Sociological Research Online on the English Riots (Allen et al. 2013).

Malcolm James is a lecturer in media and cultural studies at the University of Sussex. He combines long-term, highly participatory research methods and youth work to explore urban multiculture. Malcolm recently completed a PhD at London School of Economics. His interests in race, multiculture and youth are evident in numerous publications, and the work he has conducted with The Guardian, Open Democracy, The Runnymede Trust, Community Development Foundation, Baring Foundation and Autonomous University of the Nicaraguan Caribbean Coast.

Journal editor

Katrine Fangen is professor in sociology at the University of Oslo. She has written many books and articles on youth, right-wing extremism, racism, migration, and participant observation and extended case methods. During recent years, her main focus has been on young migrant’s experiences of exclusion and inclusion in Europe (the EUMARGINS project); on identity navigation, political involvement and citizenship among Norwegian Somalis; and more recently, nationalism and national identity in Norway (The NATION-project, funded by the Norwegian research council).

References

Allen, Kim, et al. 2013. “Collisions, coalitions and riotous subjects: reflections, repercussions and reverberations: the riots one year on.”, vol.18, no.4. Available from:http://www.socresonline.org.uk/18/4/1.html. Accessed 27th August 2014.

Back, Les. 1994. New ethnicities and urban culture: racisms and multiculture in young lives. London: UCL Press.

Back, Les, et al. 2012. “New hierarchies of belonging”. European Journal of Cultural Studies, vol.15, no.2, pp.139-154.

Bennett, Andy. 1999. “Rappin’ on the Tyne: white hip hop culture in Northeast England – an ethnographic study”. The Sociological Review, vol.47, no.1, pp.1-24.

Böse, Martina. 2003. “Race and class in the ‘post-subcultural’ economy”, in David Muggleton and Rupert Weinzierl eds. The post-subcultures reader. Oxford: Berg,

Carrington, Ben and Brian Wilson. 2004. “Dance nations: rethinking British youth subcultural theory”, in Andy Bennett and Keith Kahn-Harris eds. After subculture : critical studies in contemporary youth culture. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan,

CoDE. 2013. “Does Britain have plural cities?”: University of Manchester. Available from:http://www.ethnicity.ac.uk/census/869_CCSR_Bulletin_Does_Britain_have_plural_cities_v7.pdf. Accessed 15th September 2013.

Gilroy, Paul. 1987. “There ain’t no black in the Union Jack”: the cultural politics of race and nation. London: Hutchinson.

Harris, Roxy. 2006. New ethnicities and language use. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Hewitt, Roger. 1986. White talk black talk: inter-racial friendship and communication amongst adolescents. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Jones, Simon. 1988. Black culture, white youth: the reggae tradition from JA to UK. Basingstoke: Macmillan Education.

Kulz, Christy. 2014. “‘Structure liberates?’: mixing for mobility and the cultural transformation of ‘urban children’ in a London academy”. Ethnic and Racial Studies, vol.37, no.4, pp.685-701.

Madianou, Mirca and Daniel Miller. 2013. “Polymedia: Towards a new theory of digital media in interpersonal communication”. International Journal of Cultural Studies, vol.16, no.2, pp.169-187.

Murthy, Dhiraj. 2008. “Digital ethnography: an examination of the use of new technologies for social research”. Sociology, vol.42, no.5, pp.837-855.

Nayak, Anoop. 2003. Race, place and globalization: youth cultures in a changing world. Oxford: Berg.

Odin, Jaishree K. 1997. “The performative and processual: a study of hypertext/postcolonial aesthetic”.  Available from: http://www.postcolonialweb.org/poldiscourse/odin/odin3.html. Accessed 16th February 2012.

ONS. 2001. “Area: Newham (Local Authority) – resident population estimates by ethnic group (percentages)”.  Available from: http://neighbourhood.statistics.gov.uk Accessed 11th May 2011.

Ringrose, Jessica, et al. 2012. “A qualitative study of children, young people and ‘sexting'”: NSPCC. Available from: Accessed

Sharma, Sanjay. 2013. “Black Twitter? Racial hashtags, networks and contagion”. New Formations, vol.78,  pp.46-64.

Skeggs, Beverley. 2004. Class, self, culture. London: Routledge.

Vertovec, Steven. 2006. “The emergence of super diversity in Britain”, Available from:http://www.compas.ox.ac.uk/publications/papers/Steven%20Vertovec%20WP0625.pdfAccessed 29th November 2006.

OPPORTUNITIES

[1] Professor- Institute of Feminist and Gender Studies- University of Ottawa- deadline November 28, 2014

Replacement Professor Position
http://www.academiccareers.uottawa.ca/node/837
The Faculty of Social Sciences comprises nine academic units offering undergraduate, masters and doctoral programs in both English and French. With over 9,000 students, 260 full-time professors, and a wide array of programs and research centres, the Faculty of Social Sciences plays a key role at the heart of the University of Ottawa. Its graduate students are trained by excellent researchers and undertake cutting-edge research in the Faculty’s Master’s and Ph.D. programs.

The Faculty of Social Sciences welcomes applications for one replacement professor position in the Institute of Feminist and Gender Studies.

We are looking for candidates with expertise in one or more of the following areas:

Feminism and Transnationalism
Intersectional Feminist Analysis
Gender, Bodies and Sexualities
Queer or Trans Studies
Critical Disability Studies

We are looking for candidates with a commitment to working in a multidisciplinary context and with an ability to teach feminist and gender studies from intersectional and interdisciplinary perspectives.

Duties

  • Teach at the undergraduate and graduate levels in both English and French
    • Participate in academic and administrative activities of the University
    • Perform other activities as specified in the collective agreement

Qualifications

  • Ph.D. in any relevant field (candidates who will be defending their doctoral dissertation before September 2015 could be considered)
    • Excellence or the potential for excellence in teaching and research

Bilingualism

The University of Ottawa is a bilingual institution, and all professors in the Faculty of Social Sciences must be actively bilingual (French and English). Active bilingualism is required at the time of hiring.

Hiring conditions and salary

These are set by the current collective agreement. Positions are also subject to budgetary approval.

Duration of contract: July 1st, 2015 until June 30th, 2016; renewable for one additional year upon recommendation of the Dean.

Consideration of applications will begin November 28, 2014 and will continue until the position is filled.

Applicants must submit their curriculum vitae and a letter indicating their teaching and research experience and interests. They must also indicate their French and English language abilities. Applicants must provide full contact information for three referees; referees will be contacted for references if needed.

Applications should be sent directly to:

Michael Orsini
Director, Institute of Feminist and Gender Studies
Faculty of Social Sciences / University of Ottawa
120 University Street (Rm 11002)
Ottawa (Ontario) K1N 6N5
Fax: (613) 562-5994
Email: fem@uOttawa.ca

Take note that just a part of the message is displayed. To view the entire message, click here

 

SendSave Open full reply form